Photo credit Rita A. Reed

TRIBUTES

This page will be used to archive the tribute articles published for those artists we have lost.   These friends are dearly missed, but their music will not be lost.

 

RICK COCHRAN

RickCochran2015

A lifelong resident of West Plains, Richard Morrison “Rick” Cochran, son of the late Russell Van and Dulcie Morrison Cochran, was born July 24, 1941, at Cottage Hospital and surrendered his soul to Heaven’s keeping January 6, 2015.

In addition to his family, the loves of Rick’s life were hunting, fishing and guitar picking. As a young man, he developed a reputation as one of the area’s most savvy turkey hunters, spending countless pre-dawn hours in the woods long before the season opened, honing his calling technique while tracking the elusive birds’ movements. The many gobbler beards displayed on the walls of his music room are a testament to his skills as a hunter. His dad was also an avid outdoorsman, and the two of them kept the family supplied with a bounty of quail, dove, turkey, venison, wild duck and fish.

Rick and his brothers shared a great admiration for Chet Atkins that inspired all three to become guitar players. The Cochran brothers made numerous trips to Nashville together to spend time with their hero and indulge in various adventures, often attending the annual meeting of the Chet Atkins Appreciation Society with close family friend, Dennis Crider. His store, Rick’s Music, a fixture on The Square in the 1980s, was a picker-friendly meeting place for professional and amateur musicians alike. Weekly Thursday night jam sessions in Rick’s at-home music room were a long-standing local tradition that included musicians from all around the area. Rick welcomed one and all, from young beginners with hand-me-down acoustics to virtuoso guitar, fiddle and banjo players, giving them a space to share and enjoy making music for the pure fun of it.

A 1963 graduate of Arkansas State College, Rick taught biology at MSU-West Plains for nearly 30 years, making a lasting impact on thousands of students with his unpredictable teaching style and an ability to make learning easy, enjoyable and applicable to real life. The year of his retirement he was keynote speaker at the university’s commencement ceremony. In his speech he used the metaphor of growing gourds (one of his hobbies) and how every gourd is different to illustrate the path to a fulfilling, individual life. When the graduates accepted their diplomas, each one also received a packet of gourd seeds with written instructions for how to sprout them.

Rick was a creature of habit, and for many years you could find him eating lunch at the original Ozark Café on Washington Avenue or the Red Apple Grill on The Square. Waitresses all over town knew that Picky Ricky, as he came to be known, wanted his “toast burnt” and his “milk cold.” Wherever he went he was glad to shoot the breeze with friends and strangers alike.

Rick’s generosity shone most brightly at Christmastime, when he often bought gifts in bulk (one year buying nearly 100 Daisy Red Rider BB guns), distributing them to friends and family with glee. Endearingly eccentric, Rick was exceptional in most every way, and his life was filled with learning and humor. He was a part of the spirit of his beloved hometown, and greatly loved. His like will not be seen again.

“From the time of “Squid” Davis at the old high school, Rick has been a fascinating and charming friend, and will not soon fade from memory. He was a “character” with deep personal real character, and a massive asset to our community. A true educator and not just a teacher-talker, Rick revered knowledge and critical thinking and leaves a deep footprint wherever he has walked. If the turkeys he has dispatched went to heaven, he is deep in feathers.” R. Jack Garrett

2007 Festival - Davis Creek Rounders

2007 Festival – Davis Creek Rounders

2007 Festival - Rick Cochran

 

DON GRAVES

Photo credit Rita A. Reed

Photo credit Rita A. Reed

Don Graves, a master artist of old-time dulcimer and a dulcimer luthier from Lebanon, Missouri, died on Monday, April 14, 2014.   Born in Phillipsburg, Missouri in 1942, Don hailed from a musical family, the son of the late Bill Graves, with whom Don and his sisters Daisy and Vivian played old-time music at festivals in Missouri and beyond.  The family made many appearances at the Old Time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival here in West Plains.

 

Missouri Folk Arts Program staff posted, “We join Don Graves’ family and friends in mourning the loss of such a kind and talented man.  We will miss your music, your voice, and your smile.”

 

Don taught old-time dulcimer music in Missouri’s Traditional Arts Apprenticeship Program in 2010 and 2011. During his participation in TAAP, Don performed at Missouri’s capitol and at the Old-time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival.

 

Don was titled “The Docent of the Walking Cane Dulcimer” in a 2011 Rural Missouri article written by J. Jenkins.  “My dad, Bill Graves, played it ever since I can remember,” says Donald. “He learned to play it from my grandmother, and she learned from her father, John Mawhee, my great-grandfather. Dad played it for 75 years. When he passed away, I picked it up myself.”

 

Don was passing the tradition to his grandchildren.  Don said, “It means more to me than anybody would ever know.”  And the grandchildren replied, “For him to make us these instruments and teach us these songs, it shows us how much he loves us.”

 

As stated in the Rural Missouri article, it’s a love that has been passed down from generation to generation through the music.  “When I play, I go back in time,” Donald says. “Sometimes, I can hear Dad playing and singing while I play and sing. It takes me back, and I’ll forget where I’m at. The more I play it, the more I enjoy it.”

 

Don leaves behind his wife, Diana; son Brian; daughter Toni (Jackie); brother John; and sisters Daisy, Vivian, Melissa, Pam and Debbie; four grandchildren, and a large extended family. The family plans to continue the tradition of dulcimer playing, and we hope they will be available to perform at the Festival in years to come.

 

In 2007-08, MFAP, the Missouri Arts Council, and Exhibits USA featured Don along with five other luthiers in the traveling exhibition “Work is Art and Art is Work,” which is available to view at the Missouri Folk Arts Program’s website.

A video on Missouri Folk Arts Program Facebook page gives us a minute of Don Graves and sister Daisy Dame playing the tune, “It was Sad When that Great Ship Went Down” at the 2010 Old-Time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival.

 

Follow this link to a video of Don Graves’ Dulcimer Workshop at the West Plains Council on the Arts’ Old-time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival in 2007.

 

DON BUEDEL

Old-Time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival organizers saddened to learn of passing of one of its founders

 Don & Lori Buedel2013

WEST PLAINS, Mo. – One of the founding fathers of the Old-Time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival in West Plains, Mo., multi-instrumentalist Don Buedel, passed away peacefully in his sleep June 6, 2013, at his home in Murphysboro, Ill.

 

Buedel and his wife, Lori, were scheduled to perform on the main stage at this year’s festival, set for Friday and Saturday, June 14 and 15, in and around the West Plains Civic Center and along East Main Street.  Organizers said they are working to fill the Buedel’s performance time and Don’s workshop times and will announce the changes as soon as they are made.

 

From the first festival in 1995 and through all 19 years of its evolution, Buedel was a major factor in its mission and success, festival organizers said.  “While some musicians play old-time tunes very well, they tend to isolate the music from the lives of the tradition bearers who have preserved this music so we can, in this age enjoy it as well,” he has been quoted as saying.  “I think it’s important to remember the people, as well as the music.  Without the people, there would be no music.”

 

“All of us involved with the festival were deeply saddened to hear of Don’s passing,” organizers said.  “Don has been such an integral part of this event from the very beginning, helping to shape its purpose and supporting its mission through his own performances every year.  The work he has done to preserve and pass down the musical traditions of this area is immeasurable and incalculable in its worth.  We feel privileged to have known him and worked with him so many years.  To say he will be sorely missed is truly an understatement.”  

 

A professional clock maker by trade, Buedel ran a small clock repair business, Shawnee Cottage Clock Company, in Murphysboro, but his avocation, passion and special gift was his music.  He started playing in bluegrass and old-time string bands in his hometown of Springfield, Ill., at a young age and was a multiple fiddle contest champion in recent years.  He and his wife, Lori, performed at many festivals and historical settings, including the Old-Time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival, and the Clayville Historic Site near Springfield, Ill.

 

He was a lead member of the Smoky Hollow String Band of Murphysboro and also had played with the Colbert Brothers of Willow Springs, Mo., and the Wolf Creek Possum Poachers.  In his youth, Buedel toured Germany with William Furry, now director of the Illinois Historical Society, accompanying the International Folk Dancers.

 

While residing in the Missouri Ozarks in the 1990s, Buedel, with support from the Missouri Folk Arts Program, collected and learned tunes from longtime traditional musicians, including Howe Teague and Howell County fiddlers Charlie Hiler and Cliff Bryan, in order to teach their repertoire to others.

 

Buedel’s philosophy may have been best reflected in the following quote offered by members of the Smoky Hollow String Band on June 9, 2013.  Band members said Buedel loved this description by Don Borchelt of his great passion – a good fiddle tune:

 

“A fiddle tune is a melody that, once you hear it, you can’t seem to get it out of your head until you can grab your banjo and learn it yourself.  A fiddle tune is a living cord connecting us back to long ago generations, to feel deep in ourselves just a fragment of feeling transmitted from across the ages by some plain common folk, our ancestors otherwise long forgotten.  A fiddle tune is a kind of tune that has a lot of music concentrated in just a little bit of space, and in that respect it is to notes what poetry is to words.  A good fiddle tune you can play for a very long time and not get tired of it.  A good fiddle tune is a tune that you can never quite play the same way twice, even when you want to.  A good fiddle tune will bring two or more people together who might otherwise be enemies.  Fiddle tunes all pretty much sound the same, except they all sound different when you finally hear them.  A good fiddle tune will always be remembered by somebody.  And a good fiddle tune will make you forget, for just an instant, that man is born to die.”

 

Buedel is survived by his wife, Lori; mother, Evelyne Buedel, who resided with them in Murphysboro; two sons, Josh and Clay Buedel, both of St. Louis, Mo.; a daughter, Layla Rismoen, and husband Greg, Minneapolis, Minn.; two grandchildren, Gibson Buedel and Elsa Rismoen; and his sister, Gina Vespa and husband Jim, Athens, Ill.

 

He was preceded in death by his brother, Leo Buedel Jr., who lived in Bradenton, Fla., and his first wife, Betsy Buedel, originally from Willow Springs, Mo.

 

A memorial service and celebration of life for Don Buedel is scheduled for 1 to 3 p.m. Saturday, June 15, 2013, at the General John A. Logan Museum, 1613 Edith St., in Murphysboro, Ill.  A memorial page has been set up by his family.

 

JIM LANSFORD

 

Old-Time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival

Loses Long-time Performer Jim Lansford

Lansfords6-15-12

Jim Lansford, who with his wife Kim, played at the Old Time Music Festival since its early days at the H.O.B.A. Park, left us October 30, 2012.  Together they were among the finest practitioners of the old-tie style of duo singing to be found.  Jim’s prowess on the fiddle, guitar, banjo and mandolin was superbly complimented by Kim’s innovative and meaty guitar playing, and when they sang, their voices blended together to provide a feast for the ear, as well as the heart. He will be greatly missed.  Kim continues to perform and still resides at the family farm in Galena. Missouri.