WORKSHOPS 2015

WORKSHOPS AT 2015 FESTIVAL

 

Attendees at this year’s Old Time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival will be treated to a great schedule of musical workshops during the two-day event.  Artists who know the value of passing along the knowledge and joy of traditional music will share their talents with all who want to participate.   Workshops will be held inside the Civic Center, located in the Redbud/Gohn rooms.

The schedule includes:

Friday, June 19

12-1 p.m.             Autoharp – Roe Family Singers

And

1-2 p.m.               Introduction to Bass – Roe Family Singers

2015.FestivalPhoto.RoeFamilySingers-SaraRubinstein

The Roe Family Singers are a Good-Time, Old-Time Hillbilly band from the tiny community of Kirkwood Hollow, MN. Led by wife & husband Kim and Quillan Roe, the band marries old-time sounds from barn-dances, fiddle pulls, and county fairs with the rock & roll passion of youth.

 

The Roe Family Singers mix original music and contemporary takes on old-time, traditional, and gospel tunes into one roiling & rollicking river of fresh yet familiar American music. Every performance raises a ruckus.

 

Honors include: 2012 MBOTMA Duet Competition Winners; 2012 Old-Time CD of the Year, Rural Roots Music Commission; 2011-12 McKnight Artist Fellowship for Performing Musicians; 2012 & 2010 World’s Best Jug Band, Battle of the Jugbands; 2006 Best Female Vocalist Kim Roe, City Pages

www.roefamilysingers.com www.facebook.com/roefamilysingers

 

 

2-3 p.m.               Old Time Fiddler for Beginners – Michael Fraser and Tenley Hansen

2015.FestivalPhoto.Shortleaf1

Shortleaf is a music duo (Michael Fraser and Tenley Hansen) from Missouri with strong ties to the traditions of the Ozarks. Founded by Ozark fiddler Michael Fraser, this duet specializes in high-energy music rooted in celtic and old time traditions. Haunting ballads, rip roaring fiddle tunes with a dose of southern rock will provide an evening of what one may describe as “the real Mountain Music”!

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/The-Shortleaf-Band/237135396381397

 

 

3-4 p.m.               Delta Blues Slide Guitar  – “King Clarentz” – an exploration of Depression-era country blues

KingClarentz

Clarence Brewer, better-known as King Clarentz around the Ozark mountain area where he’s a fixture on the local scene, mixes the infectious boogie rhythms of John Lee Hooker with the edgier juke joint blues modalism of R.L. Burnside and up-to-the-minute lyrics for a blend that’s both irresistible and unique in modern blues. Brewer has developed a strong local following in the Ozarks as a blues performer, sculptor, and folk artist. (One of his woodcuts adorns the cover of his debut album.) Playing slide on a Sears & Roebuck Silvertone guitar while spinning tales of voodoo, politics gone wrong, the devil’s den, fast food killing the populace, and bad women and whiskey, King Clarentz is a totally modern-thinking, cutting-edge bluesman who produces a sound that is positively crude and archaic.

 

But he’s far more than just a good-time performer with a backwoods style; Clarence Brewer is a modern artist with much to say and a beautifully raucous way of saying it. From the opening boogie rasp of “Bed Spring Boogie,” you just know this is not going to be some paint-by-the-numbers blues album, full of familiar old Albert King licks as filtered through the latest pretender to the throne. By contrast, Brewer‘s sound is so backwoods he immediately gives the impression that he couldn’t find downtown with a road map. But a deeper listen shows an artist writing original blues in the here and now, and finely wrought gems like “Fast Food, Slow Death” and “Old GOP” sport pointed lyrics lurking in power-boogie clothes. Produced by SkeletonsMorells genius Lou Whitney and ably backed by the Skeletons, who provide minimal but perfect support, tracks like “Halloween Blues” and “Juice in the Hole” shine like the raw diamonds they are. For interesting covers, King Clarentz takes on John Lee Hooker‘s “Whiskey and Women,” Jessie Mae Hemphill‘s “Spyin’ and Talkin’,” Robert Johnson‘s “Preachin’ Blues” (a Johnson tune that hasn’t been done to death and is nicely approached here), and, of all things, Procol Harum‘s “Whiskey Train,” making a fitting closer for an album that truly takes some chances and brings a new voice to the blues in the bargain.

 

http://www.ozarksfirst.com/story/old-time-music-ozarks-heritage-festival-king-clare/d/story/9ACASvZ_EkyeHOymFwCIBg

 

 

 

 

Saturday, June 20

 

12-1 p.m.             Clogging and Buckdancing – Roe Family Singers

2015.FestivalPhoto.RoeFamilySingers-SaraRubinstein

The Roe Family Singers are a Good-Time, Old-Time Hillbilly band from the tiny community of Kirkwood Hollow, MN. Led by wife & husband Kim Roe (Best Female Vocalist, City Pages/Village Voice) and Quillan Roe (Accident Clearinghouse), the band marries old-time sounds from barn-dances, fiddle pulls, and county fairs with the rock & roll passion of youth.

 

The Roe Family Singers mix original music and contemporary takes on old-time, traditional, and gospel tunes into one roiling & rollicking river of fresh yet familiar American music. Every performance raises a ruckus.

 

Honors include: 2012 MBOTMA Duet Competition Winners; 2012 Old-Time CD of the Year, Rural Roots Music Commission; 2011-12 McKnight Artist Fellowship for Performing Musicians; 2012 & 2010 World’s Best Jug Band, Battle of the Jugbands; 2006 Best Female Vocalist Kim Roe, City Pages. www.facebook.com/roefamilysingers
1-2 p.m.               Harmonica Gathering – Seth Shumate

seth-schumate-2-1024x683

It’s been called a French harp, a mouth harp, a blues harp and a mouth organ, but its proper name is harmonica, and it will be the featured instrument of a demonstration and workshop 1-2 p.m., Saturday, June 20, at the Old-Time Music, Ozark Heritage Festival.             Nearly everyone has wished they could play the harmonica, organizers said, and for those who are old enough, their wish began with what was once called a horse opera.  In those thrilling days of yesteryear, no bona-fide Western movie would be without its lonesome cowpoke, a nightrider, soothing the little doggies with a tune on his pocket harmonica.  It’s a vision etched into the head of every old Gunsmoke or John Wayne fan.             Those who are younger may have caught the yearning to play the blues harp when they listened to Bob Dylan or wondered what that whiney little bent note thing was that John Lennon was playing on “Love Me Do”.             Neither John Wayne, the lonesome cowpoke, Bob Dylan or the Beatles will be appearing at the festival, but the harmonica will during a gathering that will give festival goers a chance to celebrate, learn about, and possibly learn how to play the diatonic, 10-note harmonica, organizers said.             The gathering will be hosted by Seth Shumate, an Arkansas native whose grandfather and great-grandmother played the instrument all their adult lives.  Shumate said he acquired the habit in the seventh grade.  Since then he has practiced, studied the history and currently plays with The Ozark Highballers.                Free harmonicas will be provided to the first 70 participants in the gathering.  To learn more about Shumate, search YouTube for Old Time Harmonica.

 

http://www.ozarkhighballers.com/

 

2-3 p.m.               Banjo – Van Colbert

2014 Festival Banjo Workshop - Van Colbert

Old-time music has been a family tradition for generations for Colbert Brothers Van, Vernon and John, all of whom hail from Willow Springs, Mo.  “Mom and Dad instilled in us the love of their music, and to this day we play, sing and remember,” said Van, who is known for his unique “two-finger” roll style on banjo.

 

The Colbert’s grandfather, Hall Colbert, moved the family from the Buffalo River region of Arkansas during the Depression years.  He and his wife, Ethel, their four boys, Leon, Bob, Truett and John, and their four daughters, Geneva, Gladys, Jewell and Marge, traveled by horse and wagon to the Howell County community of Amy where they established new roots and Hall preached as a Baptist minister and sang.

The Colbert’s father, Joseph Truett, who was named for a famous turn-of-the-century minister, taught himself to play a banjo he built by stretching a groundhog skin over the hoop for a head.  He taught Van’s older brothers to chord the guitar and enjoyed playing along once they could carry a tune.  Mother Vernieca May (Easley) Colbert also was a beautiful singer and lady, Van said, and before she passed away last year, they could always encourage her to sing “Beautiful Brown Eyes,” “Red River Valley,” “Maple on the Hill” and “Wildwood Flower” to their accompaniment.   Brother Leon Colbert of Wichita, Kan., has joined brothers Van, Vernon and John on fiddle.

 

Van’s Facebook page – https://www.facebook.com/van.colbert

 

 

 

 

3-4 p.m.               Hammered Dulcimer – Victoria Johnson with Gail Morrissey

2015.FestivalPhoto.Gail&VikkiJohnson

Victoria Johnson has been playing music most of her life but one beautiful day in summer she heard her first hammer dulcimer and it was love at first listen. She also plays the guitar and fiddle in addition to the Hammered Dulcimer. Over the course of time she has had the privilege of playing with a number of great musicians at festivals, workshops and concerts. She was the 2002 Southern Regional Hammered Dulcimer Champion, 2002 Southern Regional Ensemble – Second place and the 2004 Oklahoma State Champion. In 2003 she traveled to the Isaseki Bon Festival in Isaseki Japan representing Springfield along with the Hammer & Strings Dulcimer group. Victoria also holds an MFA in Drawing from Southern Illinois University.

Gail Morrissey started playing music in the Springfield public school system as a percussionists. She went on to perform with the Springfield Youth Symphony, and was Drum Captain of the Central High School Kilties. She has sang and played and performed with many folk and gospel groups in the surrounding area. She and Victoria have played folk music together now for more than 18 years, eventually forming the group Stringfield. 2006 Gail won the Southwest Regional Hammered Dulcimer contest in Mountain View, Arkansas held at the Ozark Mountain Folk Center.  She won honorable mention at the National completion held in Winfield, KS. When she is not playing music she is working for her church and spending time with family.

 

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Stringfield/86752647544

http://www.reverbnation.com/stringfield

 

 

4-5 p.m.               Finger-picking guitar, rhythm guitar, and ukulele – Dennis Crider

Gallery.Crider2015BioPhoto

Music and photography have been passions of Dennis since early childhood and his interest in the two has never waned. In fact, he is busier now than ever with both endeavors at the ripe old age of 70.

He remembers loving the sound of Les Paul and Mary Ford even before he started kindergarten in his home town of Wichita, Kansas. A few years later he gained appreciation of the finger style techniques of Merle Travis and Chet Atkins and around age 12 he began thumping on a banjo ukulele and a hard-to-play Stella acoustic guitar.

His older brother, Lester, learned the Merle and Chet method about this time so Dennis had to try the same thing. There were no instructional videos in the 1950s so Lester and Dennis had to essentially teach themselves.

Practicing sometimes 12 hours a day and having no knowledge of music theory, Dennis managed to get the thumb and fingers to mimic the sounds of Merle and Chet, but his best style was rhythm and he often found himself backing his brother.

Off to college in 1961 Dennis soon found himself loving the folk sounds of The Kingston Trio, Peter Paul and Mary and Randy Sparks’ New Christy Minstrels. He was instrumental in forming a group which was called The Windy Hill Minstrels after seeing Sparks’ group perform in Oklahoma City.

Although he loves almost all forms of music, Dennis flunked a music appreciation class in college. But that did not deter him from expanding his love of guitar music.

Upon arriving in West Plains in 1969 to begin a 39-year career at the Daily Quill Newspaper, Dennis met Rick Cochran who was a whiz at the finger style and they enjoyed many hours picking together. A few years later, Rick’s older brother, Russ, moved back to West Plains. He also is a great guitar player, so that merger resulted in a trio which played together many years.

After retiring from The Quill in 2008, Dennis was fortunate enough to join long-time music partner Marideth Sisco in the Oscar-nominated movie “Winter’s Bone.” Both appeared in the film during a musical birthday party scene, Dennis playing guitar and Marideth singing. The movie exposure resulted in forming the Blackberry Winter Band which was heard in the movie as well as on the film’s soundtrack.

In 2011, the film’s producers sent the band on a nationwide tour which included performances in British Columbia, San Francisco, Hollywood, New York City, Boston and several other cities. Today the band continues to perform with Dennis mainly playing rhythm with a few finger picking breaks.

He also can be found on some Friday nights jamming with his bluegrass buddies at the West Plains Music Store playing his Sweet P guitar. His guitar, named after his wife, Phyllis, was handcrafted by local luthier Phil Orlikowski.

https://www.facebook.com/dennis.crider.1

 

 

5-6 p.m.               Delta Blues Slide Guitar  – “King Clarentz” – an exploration of Depression-era country blues

 KingClarentz

Clarence Brewer, better-known as King Clarentz around the Ozark mountain area where he’s a fixture on the local scene, mixes the infectious boogie rhythms of John Lee Hooker with the edgier juke joint blues modalism of R.L. Burnside and up-to-the-minute lyrics for a blend that’s both irresistible and unique in modern blues. Brewer has developed a strong local following in the Ozarks as a blues performer, sculptor, and folk artist. (One of his woodcuts adorns the cover of his debut album.) Playing slide on a Sears & Roebuck Silvertone guitar while spinning tales of voodoo, politics gone wrong, the devil’s den, fast food killing the populace, and bad women and whiskey, King Clarentz is a totally modern-thinking, cutting-edge bluesman who produces a sound that is positively crude and archaic.

 

But he’s far more than just a good-time performer with a backwoods style; Clarence Brewer is a modern artist with much to say and a beautifully raucous way of saying it. From the opening boogie rasp of “Bed Spring Boogie,” you just know this is not going to be some paint-by-the-numbers blues album, full of familiar old Albert King licks as filtered through the latest pretender to the throne. By contrast, Brewer‘s sound is so backwoods he immediately gives the impression that he couldn’t find downtown with a road map. But a deeper listen shows an artist writing original blues in the here and now, and finely wrought gems like “Fast Food, Slow Death” and “Old GOP” sport pointed lyrics lurking in power-boogie clothes. Produced by SkeletonsMorells genius Lou Whitney and ably backed by the Skeletons, who provide minimal but perfect support, tracks like “Halloween Blues” and “Juice in the Hole” shine like the raw diamonds they are. For interesting covers, King Clarentz takes on John Lee Hooker‘s “Whiskey and Women,” Jessie Mae Hemphill‘s “Spyin’ and Talkin’,” Robert Johnson‘s “Preachin’ Blues” (a Johnson tune that hasn’t been done to death and is nicely approached here), and, of all things, Procol Harum‘s “Whiskey Train,” making a fitting closer for an album that truly takes some chances and brings a new voice to the blues in the bargain.

 

http://www.ozarksfirst.com/story/old-time-music-ozarks-heritage-festival-king-clare/d/story/9ACASvZ_EkyeHOymFwCIBg

 

‘Discover Nature’ Workshops Set

The “Discover Nature’’ fishing workshops offered for families and kids by the Missouri Department of Conservation will include casting tips 11 a.m. to noon Friday and noon to 1 p.m. Saturday. The knot-tying workshops will be 2 to 3 p.m. Friday and Saturday.

They will be presented by MDC employees who will be available throughout the two days.